Healing Arts Workshop 2015

Healing Arts workshops are held at the School every year. This year they were held on 14th June and were run by a small group of Anthroposophic therapists who are available to support many health needs of the school children and wider community.

Our topic was ‘Sleep’ and included workshops on nursing therapy (Adrienne Henry & Rebecca Wilson) movement therapy (Heather Verstappen) and music therapy (Patsy Cooper). We looked at possible causes of sleep problems, and how to alleviate them.

All therapists are trained (or are in training) in their particular field.

Around 20 people from the school community as well the wider Motueka area came to see the different approaches used. A simple but nourishing lunch was provided.

Nursing therapy

The importance of sleep for all was discussed and practical advice of how to support sleep, were suggested. This ranged from reducing stimuli prior to bed, having a bedtime rhythm so your body/child knows its time for sleep, using anthroposophical medicines that can aid sleep, use of footbaths, having an abdominal or liver compress depending on indications as well as going to an anthroposphical nurse who can also offer a Rhythmical Body Oiling among other things.

Movement therapy looked at the importance of the developmental movements that babies, toddlers and young children make and how these movements relate to brain development, which controls balance, coordination and the ability to focus. One gentle movement exercise to help a child to relax before sleep was demonstrated.

Music therapy looked at some of the possible causes of sleep problems, including mental (i.e.stress) or physical (i.e.organ problems) or developmental problems (children). These could be addressed through the use of different types of music and a variety of instruments. Through this process the child or adult could be strengthened, brought more into balance, and relaxed.

Donations from these workshops go into the School Therapy fund, which is used to help school parents who are unable to fully pay for therapies that may be beneficial for their children.